0 comments on “Southern Sydney Branch”

Southern Sydney Branch

44 years of community education, walking and activism

Gary Schoer and Peter Vaughan, Executive Committee, Southern Sydney Branch

The Sutherland Sub Branch (of Sydney Branch) of the National Parks Association of NSW was established in 1972. Bob Spencer was the first Convenor. In 1973 Gary Schoer was encouraged by Bob to step into this role. On the 6th of August 1986 a meeting was held to elect office bearers and establish a full Southern Sydney Branch of NPA; 27 members attended the meeting at Gymea Community Centre.

After the 1986 election Bob Crombie, a ranger at Royal National Park, spoke on the issues threatening the Hacking River and Royal National Park, especially the proposed Helensburgh urban development. NPA joined with Total Environment Centre and local groups in fighting to prevent a major expansion of urban development in the catchment of Royal National Park. This success provided the momentum for the Branch to be a key group for advocating for “The Royal” and southern Sydney’s natural areas ever since.

0 comments on “Byarong Creek Cascades”

Byarong Creek Cascades

Featured Walk

Byarong Creek Cascades – 3-4hrs

“An urban adventure following the footsteps of my Grandfather up to the cascades and waterfall,” says Jenae Johnston from Bushwalk the ‘Gong.

When I recently hiked this trail I was the fourth generation to retrace the steps (fifth if I could’ve convinced the kids to come!) of my Great Grandfather Mr. Percy Kennedy. A keen amateur geologist and an active citizen of Wollongong, Percy was convinced of evidence of an extinct volcano under Mt Robertson as he explored the beautiful Byarong Creek and its cascades in the early 1930’s. Today I set out to do a reconnoitre with my Dad in town, with some vague directions recalled from the 1950-60’s from his own personal adventures as a kid.

0 comments on “Yarriabini National Park”

Yarriabini National Park

Featured National Park

Brian Everingham, President Southern Sydney Branch, National Parks Association of NSW
You will find Yarriabini National Park a short distance south of Macksville or, if travelling from further south, roughly 45 km from Kempsey. Turn into Albert Drive at Warrell Creek and follow the signs for ‘Yarrahapinni Mountain’ or ‘Yarriabini National Park’. This is the beloved backyard of one of the great members of NPA, James Tedder, now deceased. This patch of land lies to the east of his home at Grassy Head and it is him and other local conservationists that we can thank for the protection, gazettal and effective management of this land. Mind you, Jim would also add that the park is not yet complete. We know he wished for the lands north of The Pines picnic area and along Way Way Creek Road to be added to the park and, perhaps, one day we shall see his wish fulfilled.

0 comments on “Sea Slug Census”

Sea Slug Census

Citizen Science Dive Program

John Turnbull, Member, National Parks Association of NSW

  • Category: Shore dives and rock pools
  • Depth: Various, to 20 m
  • Rating: Easy
  • Access: SCUBA, snorkelling and rock platform walking
  • Special equipment: Underwater camera

In a recent edition of Nature NSW we published a Creature Feature on nudibranchs. These curious, diverse molluscs are a favourite find for divers. They are also excellent indicators of climate change, thanks to their visibility, ease of identification and seasonality.

0 comments on “Fungi – the Forgotten Kingdom”

Fungi – the Forgotten Kingdom

David Noble, Member, National Parks Association of NSW

When you look at an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) or National Park Plan of Management, you always see sections on flora and fauna, but seldom even a mention of Fungi. The Fungi Kingdom seems to be somewhat neglected.

This should not be the case as fungi are found in all environments. They are around the roots of most plants, and in the stomachs of most animals. They range in size from microscopic yeasts to huge fungal mycelium that thread their way through hundreds of hectares. They make up perhaps 25% of the biomass.