0 comments on “We can’t see the trees for the wood”

We can’t see the trees for the wood

Dr Oisín Sweeney, Senior Ecologist, National Parks Association of NSW

This is an amended article from one that first appeared on the Independent Australia website on 27 March 2017

On the morning of March 21st I got a call from a journalist in response to a media release NPA had put out for International Day of Forests. She wanted me to discuss forests – after she spoke to Planet Ark, who were celebrating World Wood Day!

2 comments on “Leadbeater’s Possum Fact Sheet”

Leadbeater’s Possum Fact Sheet

This Fact Sheet was produced by Fenner School of Environment and Society, Australian National University Canberra, ACT, 2601

Scientists at The Australian National University have been researching Leadbeater’s Possum since mid-1983. They have published more than 200 peer-reviewed scientific articles and 8 books on the Victorian Central Highlands and Leadbeater’s Possum. This Fact Sheet provides key information on Leadbeater’s Possum and the threats to its habitat.

0 comments on “Reversing declines of Australian forests should be a national priority”

Reversing declines of Australian forests should be a national priority

High rates of forest clearing in Queensland and Western Australia—with NSW set to follow—act in concert with intense native forest logging as an all-out assault on Australian forest environments says the National Parks Association of NSW (NPA).

It’s easy to become blasé about forests when living on the eastern seaboard of Australia, because most settlements (including the large urban areas of Sydney and Brisbane) are fringed by forests and daily life puts millions in contact with forests and forest animals like king parrots and kookaburras.

0 comments on “A Better Future for Public Native Forests”

A Better Future for Public Native Forests

It’s possible with diverse community support

Dr Oisín Sweeney, Senior Ecologist, National Parks Association of NSW

Last year the National Parks Association NSW (NPA) released a report that showed how, despite being a noble attempt to marry some pretty uncomfortable bedfellows (logging, conservation and recreation), the Regional Forest Agreements (RFAs) have failed in all of their high level aims. From protecting the environment to maintaining long-term economic stability and jobs in forest industries, the RFAs have not worked. A new approach is desperately needed writes Oisín Sweeney.

0 comments on “Expiry of first Regional Forest Agreement offers opportunity to end the forest wars”

Expiry of first Regional Forest Agreement offers opportunity to end the forest wars

Wednesday the 3rd February is a milestone in the long and chequered history of native forest management in Australia. The first Regional Forest Agreement (RFA) expires in East Gippsland following 20 years of destructive logging. Instead of just extending them, prolonging conflict and driving species towards the edge, now is the time to chart a new course says the National Parks Association of NSW (NPA).

Regional Forest Agreements are 20-year deals between the state and federal governments that permit the logging of public native forests. Across Australia, almost 7 million hectares of native eucalyptus forests are logged under 10 RFAs[1]. The RFAs were an attempt to marry conservation, logging and recreation to bring an end to the ‘forest wars’ that pitted conservationists against the logging industry. They haven’t worked.