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Natural values of Kosciuszko National Park must not be overlooked in Snowy 2.0

The National Parks Association of NSW (NPA) has cautiously welcomed the federal government finally appearing to embrace renewable energy in the context of Snowy 2.0. But politicians still haven’t outlined how the scheme would avoid damaging the natural values of the unique alpine ecosystems and judgement must therefore be reserved.

NPA CEO, Mr Kevin Evans said: “The vulnerability of the alpine ecosystems to climate change encapsulates perfectly why we urgently need to transition to renewables.

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Will the Darling River Survive?

Terry Korn, President, Australian Floodplain Association

The health of the Darling River system is at a tipping point. Can the system survive the next round of negotiations over how it should be managed? Terry Korn, president of the Australian Floodplain Association discusses a major issue of concern which could seriously impact on recovery of water for the environment, floodplain graziers, Aboriginal culture and small communities downstream of Bourke.

The Australian government has committed almost $15 billion to the largest rural restructure program in Australia and expects to effect significant changes to water management in the Murray-Darling Basin without affecting the reliability of water supply to the irrigation industry. This is an admirable but unreal aspiration.

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A Plan To Protect Kosciuszko’s Water Catchments

Graeme L. Worboys, Adjunct Fellow, Fenner School of Society and Environment, Australian National University

Large numbers of the Wild Horse, a farm-animal escapee, are severely impacting the water catchment wetlands of the Australian Alps, including right across Kosciuszko National Park. In 2014, 35% of the Alps wetlands had been damaged. These high mountain wetlands are the very heart of the headwater catchment sources for our mightiest rivers, the Murray, Murrumbidgee and the Snowy and regrettably they are also a preferred grazing area for these heavy stock animals. Numbers of Wild Horses have grown from about 2,000 to more than 6,000 in just 11 years and they are causing great damage to the catchments. The NSW Government, in response to these threats has launched, in May 2016, a draft Wild Horse Management Plan for consultation … a plan, amongst other things, to protect the water catchments.

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A plan to protect Kosciuszko’s water catchments

Large numbers of the Wild Horse, a farm-animal escapee, are severely impacting the water catchment wetlands of the Australian Alps, including right across Kosciuszko National Park. In 2014, 35% of the Alps wetlands had been damaged. These high mountain wetlands are the very heart of the headwater catchment sources for our mightiest rivers, the Murray, Murrumbidgee and the Snowy and regrettably they are also a preferred grazing area for these heavy stock animals. Numbers of Wild Horses have grown from about 2000 to more than 6000 in just 11 years and they are causing great damage to the catchments. The NSW Government, in response to these threats has launched, in May 2016, a draft Wild Horse Management Plan for consultation … a plan, amongst other things, to protect the water catchments.